Ep #58: Conversation with Jody Moore

 In Podcast

This week, Kris interviews amazing women who talk about how they’re pivoting and negotiating these unparalleled times. In this interview, Kris talks with Jody Moore, Certified Life Coach, Podcaster, Leadership and Sales Coach, Latter-day Saint.

Biography – Jody Moore

Jody Moore

Jody is a mother, speaker, Master Certified Life Coach and the owner of Jody Moore Coaching where she helps women improve their self-concept, live from empowering emotions and accomplish their goals. She has a multiple 7 figure coaching practice where she works with her clients online teaching classes and hosting live calls, supplemented with live events.

She has 4 children ages 4 to 13 and resides with them and her husband in Spokane, Washington. Prior to founding her coaching practice, Jody earned her Bachelor’s degree from Utah State University and a Master’s Degree at the University of Phoenix where she worked for many years as a sales trainer and leadership coach.

 

What you’ll find in this episode:

  1. What Jody’s first thoughts were when she heard about the pandemic.
  2. The importance of changing your lens length.
  3. What Jody means by sowing activities and reaping activities in her business.
  4. About Martha Beck, the evolution of the caterpillar and the need for cocooning.
  5. What Forrest Gump and the shrimping business can teach us during these times.
  6. Why not to be afraid of the wisdom that might be whispering to you right now.
  7. The risks Jody has taken while not being afraid to be seen.

Featured on the Show and Other Notes:

  • Jody’s podcast called Better Than Happy
  • Learn about working with Jody and her BE BOLD program at www.jodymoore.com.
  • Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
  • Kelly McGonigal and The Upside of Stress: Why Stress Is Good for You, and How to Get Good at It
  • My new program called Leading Through Crazy Times just started. We’ll cover the four essential areas you need to focus on as a leader: your brain, your plan, your focus and your team. This will include an employee kit (a special module with 8 lessons/insights for your team and anyone else you care about to share with freely), two coaching calls per week and Saturday calls every other weekend.
  • Reply to any of my emails I send you or go to Instagram or Facebook and let me know how I can help. What are the top things that are on your mind?
  • I read reviews on the show! If you like this podcast, please leave a review. Go to your podcast app and find the reviews section. Thank you!
  • The Founder’s Lab is my private coaching program for female founders who are generating more than 7-figures in their revenue. It’s a complement to the Entrepreneurial Management program (with Brooke Castillo) and is a part of the work you get as a client of mine. This isn’t a “class.” I don’t give you copious tons of things to do. I give you the ones that matter and then we keep talking about them. We apply them. That’s why it’s called the Founder’s Lab.
  • Go here to book an appointment with me.

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Podcast Transcript

Kris:

Hey. I’m Kris Plachy, host of the Lead Your Team Podcast. Running a million dollar business is not easy, and whether you’re just getting started with building your team or you’ve been at this for a while, I’m going to bring you honest, specific, and clear practices you can use right now today to improve how well you lead your team. Let’s go ahead and get started.

Kris:

Okay. Hello everybody. Welcome, welcome. I’m so excited to have the first of a few interviews I’m going to be having with some amazing women who I know and have worked with for quite some time about how they’re pivoting and how they’re negotiating what is just an unparalleled and disruptive time in our time as business leaders but also as family members and family and community leaders and so forth. So I’m super excited to have Jody Moore join us today.

Kris:

Hi, Jody Moore.

Jody:

Hi. I’m the first. I didn’t know that. That’s exciting.

Kris:

Always first. So I’m going to have Jody talk a little bit about herself here in a second, but I’m going to talk about Jody too because I’ve known Jody a very long time. Long time. What has it been do we think? Do we want to venture?

Jody:

Probably 11 or 12 years I’d guess.

Kris:

[crosstalk 00:01:37] the same thing. Yeah. Jody and I used to work together in a former life, and then we just, our lives kept intersecting professionally and then by natural path, just personally because I love her and I just like to sit next to Jody and be close to her. But Jody is many things wrapped up. And one of the best coaches I think on the planet. She’s somebody I go to when I need help to help me think, and she is a wizard when it comes to how she thinks about how to serve her client and her community. She just has really, really sound and simple but like obvious solutions that she’s able to come up with. So I’ve been, as I always am reluctant to say this because it sounds a little maternal, but I have been very proud as I’ve watched my friend Jody grow in her business.

Jody:

Yeah. Because you taught me, let’s be honest, a lot of what I know today.

Kris:

Yeah, I might’ve started it. Let’s start with that.

Jody:

You did.

Kris:

Introduce you. Yeah, there you go.

Jody:

You introduced me to the coaching tools but also to so much that it serves me today in my business about leadership and so many things.

Kris:

Well, thank you. We’ve been good partners for a very long time.

Jody:

Yeah. It’s true.

Kris:

We also have fun times in Mexico together.

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

So what I want Jody to do today is… First of all, I’m going to give you a minute. I want you to talk about your business, and then I really want to just get in your brain because we know so much of where success comes from, our ability to be resilient, where all of that comes from starts in the mind.

Jody:

Yeah.

Kris:

So let’s talk about you and your beautiful business. What do you do?

Jody:

Okay. I have an online business where I coach mostly members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, which is the church I belong to. So most of my clients share my same faith, and most of them are women, mothers, stay-at-home moms, or working moms just navigating life, just raising kids, marriage. A lot of them have a lot of goals that we’re trying to achieve. So anything that fits under the coaching realm in terms of either solving problems or achieving goals that all is at least in alignment with the values of our faith. So yeah.

Jody:

It’s evolved over the years, but today it’s a membership style business model where I coach and teach classes and offer tools online in group format.

Kris:

What I love about what Jody does is while you have your tribe, your community originates from your Latter-Day Saints community. Everything Jody teaches, you guys, we all need to know because you also have a wonderful podcast, right?

Jody:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kris:

And the name of your podcast is Better Than-

Jody:

Happy.

Kris:

[crosstalk 00:04:48] saying it wrong. Say that again.

Jody:

Yeah, no. That’s right. Better Than Happy.

Kris:

The name of her podcast is Better Than Happy, and she just, again… These pearls and these gems, and I know that Brooke and I will even talk… We both read all your emails.

Jody:

Oh. That’s so nice.

Kris:

She honestly was just on a walk. She just said, “I just read Jody’s email.”

Jody:

Aw.

Kris:

She was talking about some webinar or something that you’re doing, and Brooke’s like, “We have to go to find out what the answer is.”

Jody:

That means I did a good job writing that email. That’s so nice. Yeah. I mean, I do get people ask that a lot. If I’m not a member of your church, and the truth is my emphasis is on mental and emotional health. But a lot of times clients will come to me and if they’re struggling in a certain area of their life, they want to know that I understand how their religion comes into play. So I understand that part. But even within my own religion, there are varying levels of belief. So it’s really not about me imposing my religious beliefs on anyone so much as I understand how religion plays a role in your head and then into your life.

Kris:

Compliments everything. It’s beautiful. So it’s been lovely to watch you grow this, and I know that I work with clients who have online businesses, I work with clients who have brick and mortar. Certainly a lot more of the clients who are public facing interact with the public every day in a building are more significantly impacted right now by the shut downs that are happening or the shelter-in-place or whatever your language is, state that you’re in.

Jody:

Yes. Right.

Kris:

But I’m kind of curious for you, this was like a rolling tide how this all came together across the US. I would love to know as a business owner, not necessarily as a mom with your own kids and a family, but just as a woman running a business, what were your original or if you can recall, your initial thoughts when you started hearing about this happening?

Jody:

My original thoughts were sort of panicked, to be honest. Because even though I have an online business, I heard it described this way that a month ago as a society, we were operating at the top of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and so people were focused on self-actualization and personal involvement. And what this pandemic has done is dropped us all to the bottom of Maslow’s hierarchy, and now we’re just worried about survival.

Kris:

Where is the toilet paper?

Jody:

Right.

Kris:

I just offered a client on a Zoom call, she had a thing of Clorox wipes sitting on her counter behind her. I’m like, “Can I send you $87 for those Clorox wipes, please?”

Jody:

Supply and demand.

Kris:

Exactly. Yeah. Fortunately another client held up another bottle, and she’s like, “I’ll just send you these for free.” I’m like, “Oh. Well, you’re a good person.”

Jody:

So sweet.

Kris:

I would’ve paid you $87 for them.

Jody:

Right.

Kris:

But yeah, absolutely. That’s such a great analogy.

Jody:

Yeah. So what I offer to me falls more in the middle of the hierarchy. Really if your marriage is struggling or you’re really unhappy, that’s a pretty important thing to pay attention to but not as important as can I feed my family and pay my rent. So I did worry a little that what I’m offering at least in some people’s minds is disposable if we’re just worried about the basics. And in my program is a really reasonably priced program, so it attracts a lot of people who are living paycheck to paycheck. So if you got to start cutting things, my coaching program might be one of the first ones to go. So I was a little panicked, and at the same time, I know that what I offer is really useful right now. It’s emotional and mental support.

Jody:

So I would say it’s 50-50. Half of me worried, half of me like, you know what, no matter what happens, we’re going to be fine.

Kris:

I think that that’s an honest… I think a lot, all of us probably went through that. I know I did. I’m like, “Oh my gosh, this is my client. Small business owners are going to be hardest hit probably initially.” And yet of course then my other thought was, “But no, this is exactly why I need to work with people right now because I can help people through this.” So I think that’s very honest and real. It’s something none of us have encountered before. It’s all [crosstalk 00:09:40]

Jody:

I know. Right.

Kris:

How did you do that? How did you make your brain handle that when nothing seems like it’s just not really, and yet it is?

Jody:

Yeah. This just the way I’ve been thinking about it both for myself and my business and with my clients that I’m coaching is this is a time… And I sort of learned this terminology from you actually in a course that you used to teach on difficult people where you would talk about changing your lens length. And I find that that’s really necessary right now. So I can’t really tell you what I’m going to be doing in my business even a month from now. Last year I could’ve told you what I was going to be doing all year. At least what I thought I was going to be doing.

Kris:

Exactly.

Jody:

So it’s like being willing to bring that lens in closer helps me because, this is the analogy I’ve been using, it’s like I feel like we’re all trying to just solve a puzzle that’s in the future. So we don’t even know how many pieces it is, what shape the pieces are. We don’t even know what the picture is that we’re trying to create. And that is so stressful to the brain because the brain wants to be able to problem solve, but it can’t attach to any variables because we don’t know what the variables will be. And so the only puzzle I know I can solve is the puzzle that’s right in front of me right now. Those are the pieces I have, those are the variables I’m aware of, and those might change tomorrow or next week. But when I bring that lens length in and even though I know we’re not going to go back to how things were or any of that, but we are going to get to a point where we’re able to lengthen our lens again and we’re able to see further ahead.

Jody:

So this really short term, let’s just decide what we’re going to do this week or this month, and then next month we decide next month, that part is temporary. So I’m okay with this is the puzzle we’re solving today, and when my brain wants to freak out of what are we going to do in six months, I just tell it, “I don’t know yet because I don’t even know what puzzle we’re going to be solving in six months.”

Kris:

I love that analogy because that’s something I know I talk about a lot. We all think we know exactly how life will be, and you’re right, especially in business, we make our annual plan. We have our quarterly plan. We just believe that’ll be that way, and we have such a level of certainty and then safety comes with that too. We feel safe. Well, of course that’s all going to happen.

Jody:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). And then it doesn’t. Then it doesn’t.

Kris:

Then all of a sudden, we’re like, “Wait, we’re unsafe.” You were never really safe or you were never really unsafe. It just depends on… Right?

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

So as long as you believe what you’re saying is I don’t know the puzzle, but I know what I can do today.

Jody:

Well, and when I get to that future point, then that puzzle will be there, and then I will get to work figuring out how to solve it. So I constantly am telling myself that if and when that problem even occurs, then we will have to do deal with it then. But this kind of short-term emergency type thinking doesn’t serve us always. We want to have quarterly plans and annual plans and 10-year goals. But in a crisis like this, you bring that lens length in, and that’s where I find peace. The other thing that I think about that’s been really helpful for me is, I’ve always thought about this with my business, is that there are times in my business or even just certain activities in my business that I call sowing activities and others that are reaping activities, called reaping times.

Jody:

And so even just a month ago, I would’ve said it was more of a reaping time in my business where a lot of the work I’ve been doing over the past six years is paying off now, and we’re seeing the benefits of that. And as soon as this pandemic hit, I’m like right back into the sowing mode. I’m planting seeds, and I don’t mean I’m strategically, “Hey, one day I’m going to cash in on this.” I just mean this is a time for me to show up and serve my community and over deliver to my clients and over deliver to people that are not my clients and put as much good out there as I can. And one day that is going to come back to me. I don’t know how. I don’t expect it in a direct linear way. But I’m like doing massive sowing right now in terms of planting seeds, and I don’t know what that will do in the end. But that feels like the right thing to me to do. Not that I’ve stopped sowing either. We’re still doing that. But it’s more of a sowing time in my business, and there will be reaping time in the future.

Kris:

I love, love that. I think there’s a lot of value in that from a service perspective, that’s certainly been my thought. It’s just how can I help, how can I help, how can I help. This is exactly what I’m supposed to be doing, so I’m just all in. And I also love it because I think it helps us stay very focused, and it gives your brain direction and purpose in a time where it could be very confused and idle and destructive. [crosstalk 00:14:43]

Jody:

Right.

Kris:

… much free time with your mind. But I am curious because I think I’ve heard… I definitely have heard some of my clients say, “Yeah, I wish I could be creative right now, but I can’t find it. I can’t get to it.” So do you have any advice fr someone who might be thinking, “Yeah, I’d love to be taking advantage of this and sowing, but I’m either scared or I’m homeschooling 14 children.”

Jody:

Right, which I think you have to make space for all of that as well too. I think if what you’re capable of and what you need is self-care, that’s what you have to contribute to the world is to take care of yourself. I’m okay with that too. I don’t mean that everyone has to be going out serving in whatever… I don’t mean that has to look in a different way.

Kris:

[crosstalk 00:15:31] your family or even, like you said, serving…

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

Because a lot of people are discovering, “I haven’t been taking care of my body, and now I can do things I’ve never done. I can sleep in a little more. I can take nice long walks. I can meditate.” Whatever.

Jody:

Right. I’m finding…

Kris:

Yeah, [inaudible 00:15:53].

Jody:

I’m finding little things like all of us eating family dinner together every night because we’re not all going 12 directions, and I’m like, “Oh, I can make dinner, can’t I?” I’ve been telling myself I can’t or I hate it, no one will eat it. I’m like, “Oh no, we can do this.” Yeah, so there’s a lot of good coming out of it. I heard Martha Beck this week talk about change. I don’t know if you heard her webinar, but she talked about… She used the analogy of the caterpillar entering chrysalis and melting down into this gooey, icky pile of mush, which is what we’re all experiencing right now, but ultimately becomes a butterfly. And I think we are going through an evolution like that. But I love the analogy she gave of that caterpillar though needs a cocoon.

Jody:

A cocoon might be a relationship. It might be a show that you’re watching on Netflix. It might be called Outlander. It might be any number of things where you hold space for you and maybe part of that holding space for your children and your family. But I love that idea of yeah, I got a cocoon in whatever way I cocoon right now when I feel that meltdown. I find that when I do that, I make space for that, I have peaceful music that I listen to at night when I’m going to sleep because you have to turn off all the noise, whether it be positive or negative. I don’t want to hear about coronavirus at nine o’clock at night anymore. So music helps me cocoon. Just going for a drive helps me cocoon, and when I do that, I do have personally a lot to give. I have ideas. I see people suffering, and I know I can help. To me, I’m so grateful that I have that because it’s a distraction and it’s something I can do. But that doesn’t mean everyone should be doing that. I don’t mean to say that.

Kris:

Right. Well, I do think there’s this intuitive wisdom that we all to follow, and if you’re feeling like you’re cocooning because you really can’t deal, then you probably need either a coach or you need somebody who will come and help you or really good friend who you can talk to. So I think it’s powerful. You and I, I think, depending on where everybody is in the country, I’ve been saying this to all of my clients, and it’s been interesting because I coach clients all of North America. And I’ve been in shelter-in-place for almost three weeks, maybe just under, whereas some parts of the country, at the time of this recording, it’s only been a week. So there’s an evolution that everybody also is going through that process of that initial, “Okay. We can make it work.” And then there’s like, “Wait, what?”

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

What’s going on with these people? If you do run a business, you start to feel it more in your business if you are a business that’s affected. And then what I’m watching now, which is so interesting, all of my coaching calls this week, there’s been at least one, if not more than one woman on the call who said, “So I don’t really know if I want to build it the way I had it before.” Not sure.

Jody:

Which is sort of a gift, right? It’s like the reset button got hit on the Xbox. And we all get to decide what do we want, how do we want to rebuild this? And we’re going to rebuild everything even better because we know more.

Kris:

Oh, it’s going to be brilliant. And people are adding parts… People who had never had online are adding online to their business. Or they’re shutting down parts of their business line because it didn’t release or it wasn’t lucrative and they’re just getting rid of it. Where they might have had issues with people pleasing, now they don’t because it’s like, nope, can’t keep it. Or we’re always afraid of online because it was always so intimidating, and they figured it out in three days. [crosstalk 00:19:58] busy doing that.

Kris:

So yeah. I just think it’s going to be if we really do take the opportunity, because you’re absolutely right. It is a gift if we allow ourselves if you’re healthy in a time when everyone is very concerned, they won’t be.

Jody:

Right, right.

Kris:

Everybody isn’t or is not healthy. So I think it’s important to really, really capture it and not be afraid of what you might learn about yourself and what you really want.

Jody:

Yeah. That’s right. And I know this looks different for everybody in every business in terms of what they’re able to keep offering right now. But for anybody listening, I know I’ve experienced a little bit of drama about should I be selling right now? And should I make all kinds of exceptions for my clients, like if I have clients that have lost a job or whatever? Do I accommodate that? I think those are decisions that everyone has to make individually.

Jody:

But I heard Russel Brunson talk about your business thriving through economic downturn like this, and he’s been around long enough to have experienced some of it. And I loved the analogy he gave in the movie Forrest Gump when Forrest and Lieutenant Dan buy that shrimping boat. And they go out and they’re not having any luck. And then all of a sudden a big storm comes, all the other shrimp boats head in. They stay out, and they weather… They’re the only ones that stay out there, and they’re in that huge storm just getting knocked all around. But they weather that storm, and then the next morning, they head inland and all the other shrimp boats have been wiped out from the storm. And that’s when overnight they become billionaires.

Jody:

So he talks about that this is the time to weather the storm, and in whatever way that is. And that you got to stay out to sea even if you’re just barely out to sea and you’re not catching any fish, you’re still out at sea. That making offers in a responsible way of course is what will help our economy. We need people to keep spending money to keep money moving. So that helps me when I get in my head about should I be charging for this and what have you. I’m still charging the same amount. I haven’t changed my policies at all. I’m just over delivering for my clients and the general population.

Jody:

But I still need to make money. The economy needs to generate money. There’s nothing wrong with asking for money.

Kris:

With making money. Yeah.

Jody:

With making money, that’s right.

Kris:

I agree with you. I’m like if you have the capacity… There’s some people who legitimately, their businesses are shut down.

Jody:

That’s right. That’s right.

Kris:

If you have the ability to make money, I think you have almost like a responsibility to make money.

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

So that you’re supporting the people in your community. You can still pay your hairdresser and your local restaurant that you love. My biggest fear honestly is that three months from now, my favorite restaurants aren’t here. That’s going to be unacceptable to me. So I’m all in.

Jody:

Me too. I’m like we’re going to get curbside take out every week because I want to support them. I want them to still be here. I’m trying to help them weather the storm too.

Kris:

Exactly. And some of them might decide, “Wait, do we even need to have a restaurant? Maybe we should just do this delivery thing. It’s probably better and more lucrative. All we need is a kitchen.”

Jody:

I can’t wait to see what our world looks like on the other side of this.

Kris:

Oh, we are on the beginning of I just think a 10 year-

Jody:

Yeah, evolution.

Kris:

It’s crazy. And so what I love about that is for everyone listening, don’t be afraid of the wisdom that’s whispering at you right now because you might be thinking… I had a client say this to me the other day. She laid off all her employees, and then she said she got this whole other part of her business going. And then she said, “I don’t really know if I want them all back.” Okay.

Jody:

Yeah.

Kris:

Time to revision. We got to go back to the beginning. What’s the vision that you got? You built one. What’s the next one? So let’s not be afraid of what this has introduced to ourselves because Jody, I know we’ve all said this. If we could just take a break for a minute and think and look at… Now everyone hasn’t.

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

Not when you maybe planned on it, but you have it.

Jody:

That’s right. It’s here whether we want it or not so might as well use it as a gift that it is.

Kris:

Yeah. So the last thing that I want to talk to you about is that… Because I have these sort of steps that I think are really critical that I’ve watched the clients that I’m working with who are kind of weathering this, as you said, weathering the storm and making it work in a way that works for their business, without knocking themselves out at the same process. Is the final step is being willing to take a lot of risks. Take risks while being seen. And I think a lot of people are okay with risk if it’s like in a crowd and nobody really notices. But if you are the only person kind of standing out there and helping people, then there’s a lot of visibility for failure, just as much as there is for anything else.

Kris:

So what has kind of come across out of your business… Just what have you noticed about your clients and what’s happening in your community that you’ve put into the world now that you didn’t use to do that required some of that risky [inaudible 00:25:22].

Jody:

Well we started a bit of an off shoot where… So in the LDS church, we have 19 to 21 year old boys and girls who go out and serve missions and because of coronavirus, the majority of them have come home or are sort of in a holding pattern. And they’re really struggling right now. And I realized that they’re struggling obviously mentally and emotionally and that we can help them. So we’ve just quickly threw up a program. We didn’t overthink it. We didn’t try to make it perfect. I have a couple of coaches that work for me that I coordinated with, and we created some classes and some coaching calls to help them. So the risk there is there’s again the question of do we charge for this, how do we make it really affordable and try to accommodate as many people as we can but still help people get value and generate revenue? Just all those decisions, and then you have people’s judgment about that. And then it’s new for us. Working with young people is different than coaching adults. And so it’s new for us. And then there’s even a lot of judgment about should we be doing this or if we’re overstepping our bounds, and church authority is supposed to guide a lot of those things.

Jody:

So I just have to keep my head focused on my motivation is good and pure, and I feel good about my motivations. And people are allowed to think whatever they want. And yes, we may fail at it even. But the alternative is we don’t show up and help people. Kelly McGonigal wrote a book called The Upside of Stress, and she talks about one things that stress does is it helps us connect. And either that’s me reaching out for help when maybe before I was like, “No, it’s fine. I can do it on my own.” Or it’s a stepping up wanting to help. You look at 9/11 and Boston Marathon bombing, and immediate response is like, “What can I do to help? How can I help?” That’s partly how we cope with stress is say, “How can I help?” So for me, where as of now, everyone in my family’s healthy, thank goodness, and my business hasn’t been too severely impacted. So my feeling is how can I help, how can I help. So maybe it is just for me. Maybe it makes me feel better to try to help [crosstalk 00:27:54]-

Kris:

… a really great byproduct if you create the whole new solution for people because you’re trying to help you.

Jody:

And it’s a win either way. And so you do kind of have to have thick skin, at least that’s what it is for me and my business where the risk is the judgment. People have a lot of opinions of whether I should be doing this or if I’m doing it the right way or I should be charging or not.

Kris:

Or if you’re capitalizing, that’s a big one.

Jody:

That’s right. That’s right. Capitalizing on a crisis. So I’m pretty good at, “Yup, you’re allowed to think what you want.”

Kris:

Go ahead. It’s interesting is as you were talking, I just had all this kind of gel in my brain. So Jody and I worked together. We worked together in a former life, and what really brought us together as colleagues and friends was a huge disruptive crisis in a crisis that we both worked for years. And we were watching it fall apart. And there were the people who were kind of the pointy finger-y, blame-y victimees. I don’t have any better words for that. And then there was sort of this other group of us who were like, “Well, we’re going to help the people who are still here and who want to show up.” Because my mantra always was in that time was if you decide to get up, wash your hair, put on your makeup, put your lipstick on or your tie, whoever you are, and you walk through the door and you say, “Yes, please pay me for this day.” And you have a responsibility to show up.

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

So for the people who wanted to show up, I just felt so I’m going to help you have a mind that helps you function in a time that is… It is difficult. It is so confusing and uncertain. We ripped away people’s calm plans. Nobody knew how they were getting paid anymore. It was total mayhem really when I think about [crosstalk 00:29:57]

Jody:

That’s right.

Kris:

But I think we were able to really be sources of support and service at a time when a lot of leaders… We were very rudderless in a lot of ways.

Jody:

That’s right. And that got me through that too. Just stepping up going, “How can I help?” Or even saying, “I think i can help in this way. Let me help.” Yeah. It’s true. I’m just-

Kris:

Stress connects people. I think that was true for a lot of us is like we found each other because we all wanted to be parts of the solution, whatever that was going to be, and we thought we knew we had the answers. And we went about the business teaching them.

Jody:

Yeah. But there were a lot of people, at least around me, telling me, “You should be mad about this. You should be worried about this. The ship is sinking.” And you, I really gravitated to you in that time because you were like, “Well, maybe. But maybe not. And maybe we don’t have to focus on that. We’re allowed to believe whatever we want. Maybe there’s a better ship coming or maybe it’s time to get off this ship and…” [crosstalk 00:31:03]

Jody:

Yeah. That’s right. Well, and you look now… I don’t know about you, but I look at my life now and I’m so grateful that I had that experience because I learned so many things. And I still adore my time at that company. But I’m so glad I’m where I am now.

Kris:

Oh my gosh.

Jody:

I don’t know if I would’ve got off that ship if it hadn’t sunk.

Kris:

No. We hadn’t been kicked off. Yeah, no. I think it’s the truth, and that’s why when this all started happening, I really did have all of that kind of resurge for me. I was like, “Oh, wait a minute. I know how to do this.”

Jody:

Yes. That’s right. I do too.

Kris:

“I got this. Come on, follow me.” And I love being able to be that kind of instrument for change for people in these moments of uncertainty because it’s so painful to not be-

Jody:

It is. That’s right. That’s right.

Kris:

We can create that. So oh my gosh, I just love you so much, and I’m so glad you’re on my podcast.

Jody:

Thank you for having me. It’s so fun to chat with you.

Kris:

Okay. So let’s just tell people where they can find out anything and everything about you. Where do we go?

Jody:

Okay. Well, like you said, my podcast Better Than Happy is a good place if you want to hear my voice more.

Kris:

Which is a fabulous place. That’s on iTunes and all places.

Jody:

iTunes and all the places where podcasts are. And then my website is JodyMoore.com. I always have free webinars, classes, all kinds of great stuff there if you want to go.

Kris:

Okay, great. We’re going to have all of that in the show notes so that people can click on links if they prefer to go to them. But it’s Jody with a Y and Moore with an E.

Jody:

Yes.

Kris:

Just in case. [crosstalk 00:32:39]

Jody:

Perfect. Thank you.

Kris:

For anybody who doesn’t know that. All right. Thank you for being here. I’m so grateful to you for your time.

Jody:

Thanks for having me.

Kris:

Everybody else, have an incredible, incredible day. We’ll talk to you next time.

Kris:

Hey there gorgeous. Are you ready to take everything I teach you in this podcast and put it to work in your business and really learn how to master leading your team? If so, I’d love to have you as a client in the Founders Lab. To learn more about how we can work together, head on over to KrisPlachy.com/join. There you’ll see everything you need to know about the Founders Lab and how to get started. See you there.

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