Ep #99: Conversation with Natalie Bacon

 In Podcast

In today’s interview, Kris talks with Natalie Bacon, a life coach helping women live more purposefully and passionately. Natalie shares her story and the lessons about money and team structure she has learned as her company grows.

Biography

Natalie Bacon

Natalie Bacon is a life coach who helps women and moms reignite their lives. Her coaching philosophy is based on looking into the mindset of what her clients are thinking, bringing awareness to subconscious thoughts, and then helping her clients decide deliberately what stays and what goes. Her work is based on neuroprogramming and positive psychology. Natalie helps thousands of women through her 5.0 star rated podcast, Design Your Dream Life with Natalie Bacon and through her virtual life coaching program, Grow You. For a select few, Natalie also helps her clients build online businesses, just like she did.

Natalie is so dedicated and passionate to this work because of how life coaching tools have transformed her life. Specifically, Natalie went from corporate lawyer to Certified Financial Planner at an RIA, to successful entrepreneur using these tools. She paid off her $206k in law school debt and built a million-dollar business. Natalie also completely changed how she dated, which led to meeting now husband, Steve. In the process, there are so many nonquantifiable changes that Natalie experienced, such as having more peace, love, fun, and joy in her day-to-day life. Natalie uses these tools in her own life and then teaches and coaches her clients and students so they can do the same.

Natalie is an expert in applying life coaching tools to her clients lives in a variety of areas, including perfectionism, procrastination, goal setting, mindset, emotional balance, money mindset, self-confidence, work life balance, and relationships. For women and moms looking to deepen their personal development and create real, lifelong lasting change, there’s no better way to do that than with Natalie inside Grow You.

What you’ll find in this episode:

  1. Natalie’s strategies for handling money
  2. The importance of company structure and organization
  3. How to view your role as a CEO
  4. Setting goals and aligning with your values

Featured on the Show and Other Notes:

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Podcast Transcript

Kris:

Hey, I’m Kris Plachy, host of the Lead Your Team Podcast. Running a million-dollar business is not easy, and whether you’re just getting started with building your team or you’ve been at this for a while, I’m going to bring you honest, specific, and clear practices you can use right now today to improve how well you lead your team. Let’s go ahead and get started.

Hello, everybody. Welcome, welcome to this episode of the podcast. So what we thought would be fun is to have an interview today for you with Natalie Bacon, who is a life coach. She is amazing and lovely and has a beautiful business and a program called Grow You, where she helps high performing and high achieving women, moms and women, who are really needing to invest in themselves and do the work of really exploring who they want to be and what they want to create in the world in a way that feels authentic to them. Focusing on self-care and confidence, relationships, goal setting, family dynamics, you name it, all of that is in the work that Natalie does.

Kris:

And she’s just, the word I keep wanting to say is lovely. She has a wonderful spirit about her, and we had this really interesting intersection, which we talk about in the podcast. But Natalie is a client also, just has wrapped up participating in the How To CEO Program. So we spent some time in this interview talking about her and her business and her evolution and growth as a CEO. She’s just coming up on that million dollar mark, so she like many of you I imagine, can identify with those struggles of scaling and adding people and needing a lot of people to help you. Not necessarily people, but responsibilities and need more help, and yet you’re still growing and don’t have all the revenue and all those pieces. So she shares some great insight about being in the How To CEO Program, what she took away, what she learned.

Kris:

And as we’re talking about this here, the first part of January, we’re going to be opening up registration for How To CEO starting on January 20th. This is the time now to, if you’ve been planning on it and thinking about it, this will be your opportunity to join me and work with me. So I hope that the conversation that Natalie and I have helps you with that decision and helps you move forward to figure out if this is what you want to invest in here at the beginning of the year, both for you and your team and your business. So let’s turn it over to the conversation I have with Natalie. Let’s get started right now. Hey, Natalie. Thank you so much for being here on the podcast today.

Natalie:

I am honored. Thank you so much for having me.

Kris:

I’m thrilled to have you here. So our paths have intersected a few times through life coach school, and I think I have this vague memory of seeing you at an event or something from afar. I don’t know. I feel like I’ve seen you in person and as much as I’ve seen you on Instagram.

Natalie:

It’s probably true.

Kris:

And now here on zoom calls. And then we have an interesting story as we were just talking about in the pre-show discussion that your marketing firm reached out to me to come on my podcast. And we said, “Yeah, well, we usually only interview people who are clients.” And I said to Michelle, “Yeah, but I know who she is. I think it’d be an interesting conversation because she’s built this really gorgeous business.” And then all along, you had just registered for the How To CEO Program.

Natalie:

Yes, yes, at the exact same time. I just think it was so serendipitous.

Kris:

Yeah. It was destiny for us to all be here and talk about all the things. So why don’t you first just start off and tell us who you are and what you do and who you help and all the things?

Natalie:

Yes. So my name is Natalie Bacon. I help women and moms over at nataliebacon.com. I’m a life coach, so my bread and butter of my business is a coaching program called Grow You. It’s a membership site. I have a backend program that’s a little bit more geared towards business, but generally I’m just helping the women who want to take those personal development podcasts and actually apply it. So there’s coursework and coaching and all that good stuff. And as I’ve built that over the last couple of years, and I originally was a money blogger, so I really transitioned my sight.

Kris:

Really?

Natalie:

Yeah. You didn’t know that?

Kris:

I didn’t. Oh, that’ll be fun to talk about. We’re going to get into that. Okay, go ahead.

Natalie:

Yes. I should say I used to be a lawyer and I had a bunch of student loan debt and then I started a personal finance blog, which got me familiar with having an online business in a very small scale, like the extra few 1000 a month to pay for those law school loans. And then I got introduced to life coaching and became a life coach and built the business that way.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And I would say that most of my journey I haven’t felt stuck in a way where I didn’t have the next step in front of me or wanting to figure it out until building a team. And I say that because it felt, just from my experience over the last few months, it felt like it came out of nowhere and I didn’t anticipate wanting or needing the skills to manage and lead in the way that you do with a team.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And that’s when I really started bingeing on all of your content and podcasts, and at the time, my business was just under 1,000,000, about 500K, to me that feels like just under 1,000,000 [crosstalk 00:06:18].

Kris:

Of course, it is. Yes.

Natalie:

Right. And that is when I really decided I need help more than just your podcasts. And it was such perfect timing. You had just come out with How To CEO, and I didn’t even get through the entire webinar with you and I bought, like, “I’m in.”

Kris:

“That’s what I need.”

Natalie:

Yeah.

Kris:

Yeah, I think it’s really great that you were able to be honest with yourself about that. I work with a lot of clients who have a tantrum about having to deal with a team or manage a team or figure that out and so they delay getting help.

Natalie:

The opposite.

Kris:

Because they don’t want to have to deal with it.

Natalie:

Yeah, they don’t want it to be complicated or hard. So good for you for diving in. And I didn’t know you were a money blogger. So you went to law school?

Kris:

Yes.

Natalie:

Were you going to do any particular kind of law?

Kris:

Yes, so I was a lawyer. I worked at a law firm.

Natalie:

Uh-huh (affirmative).

Kris:

I did corporate law.

Kris:

Okay.

Natalie:

And I didn’t even mind the work. It’s just a certain lifestyle when you work at a really big law firm that is different than I wanted to really live. I had a really great job by lawyer standards. I didn’t hate it. It’s just working nonstop and feeling like it doesn’t really end ever.

Kris:

Well, it’s all about really getting on the partnership track and, I mean, that’s where the illustriousness and the money is, right?

Natalie:

Yep, absolutely. Yeah, and I thought, “Well, let’s learn some things about money.” And so then I did.

Kris:

Yeah. And then you blogged about that.

Natalie:

Yes. And then I became a CFP. I left that part out in the short story.

Kris:

Oh, okay. Yes, fair enough. So you were helping people with their money?

Natalie:

Yes.

Kris:

And then that’s when you realized all of the problems people have in their brains?

Natalie:

Yes, right. And I realized how you create money is not the same as managing.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And so I decided you can create money doing anything any way you want to provide value to the world. It doesn’t have to be money management. You could do it in a number of ways. So I decided to do the life coaching route because that just resonated so much more with me and how I wanted to serve the world.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And then I realized that you can’t just do it all on your own.

Kris:

Well, you can, but you only make so much.

Natalie:

And if you try to fight that, you sacrifice your own energy. Because I actually enjoyed a little bit of the hustle in the beginning, because it was like my baby and my side hustle. And then you have it as your own business and you’re like, “Okay, the money’s really nice, but I’m still working so much. I want to get this team in place.” That’s the next step.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). So here we sit.

Natalie:

Yes.

Kris:

Yes, so here you are. Okay, so I still want to dig in a little bit though, because I have this framework I always use in my mind that female entrepreneurs have to develop their relationship with their time, their money, their team, their business, and themselves.

Natalie:

Yes. I remember.

Kris:

Yeah, so your relationship with your money, we were on a coaching call yesterday and you said, “I don’t have any problem with money.” And I always love when people say that, because so many other people have a problem with their money. So what do you think as a woman who’s now a CEO of her business running a successful business, scaling a successful business, what is it that you believe about money? You’ve already said, “You just create money.” But let’s just dig into that for a minute. What do you really believe about money? And how do you help other women with that? I’m curious.

Natalie:

So I’ll start by answering that about how I have a relationship with my money. It’s a really gentle relationship. I take such care of my money and I appreciate my money and I never talk bad about my money. I’m very protective of it. It’s very funny to tell other people.

Kris:

They think you’re talking about a baby or a puppy.

Natalie:

I’m like, “I check in on my money.” I’m like, “Oh, good. You’re all there. You’re doing great.” I just have the utmost respect for it. And I have to say, I was not just naturally like this. Also, I do want to say to the person who’s not there yet with those money beliefs that if you just keep at it, it will click. But you have to earn that breakthrough, I think. But for me now, and it’s not like I have tens of millions of dollars in the bank yet, right?

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

It’s not because of the amount in there. I just choose to hold it in the highest regard and think that it’s mine to take care of, but I don’t hold too tightly. I like the flow of money. I like to create it. And I like to let it go. Those are the thoughts that serve me. I always think that money is easy to create.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

Whenever I reached the next level of money, whatever that is, when I hit 500K or when I have hundreds of thousands in the bank, that’s new, I allow space to increase that capacity. Because there’s a little bit of nerves like, “Ooh, I can have this much money?” [crosstalk 00:11:53]

Kris:

Yeah, and for some of us, it’s like, “I should spend it.”

Natalie:

Yes.

Kris:

Versus just the capacity to have. It’s funny, Brooke Castillo, who we both know clearly, is a good friend of mine, and she and I were having a conversation and I started making really good money and I wanted to do my kitchen and she’s like, “Can you just have the money? Why do you got to give your money a job?”

Natalie:

Right.

Kris:

And I was like, “Oh, but I want a new kitchen.”

Natalie:

I know, and then it’s allowing space to just want that without actually taking action and spending it right away.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

You’re like, “You can have the kitchen, but let’s just wait a second.”

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative) Yeah, and I think that there’s a parallel with what we do with people, is we want someone really bad to help us, we’re desperate, we’re desperate, we’re desperate, and then we rush to fill that void in ourselves and that’s when we usually make our worst hiring mistakes when we’re in a hurry. I love everything that you’ve said. I remember, I think Brooke taught me this, I don’t really know, but the thought that I have that I’ve believed for years is my money finds me.

Natalie:

Love that.

Kris:

That also helped me recover from fears about asking people for money. It’s like, I’m not asking you for your money. I’m asking you to give me mine.

Natalie:

Yes. One of the thoughts that I love is that money doesn’t come from people, it comes through people.

Kris:

Yeah, that’s lovely. Yeah, and when we really focus on that, I think a lot of people cling to it and they have a hard time with that thought process. But I love that. And then the other one came from Christine Kane, who I studied years ago, that money needs a map.

Natalie:

Interesting.

Kris:

So you have to give your money arteries to flow. When you don’t have good arteries, you don’t have money either.

Natalie:

I will probably learn more about that from Emily Sandberg, who I hired after listening to her in The Hottest CEO Program.

Kris:

Fabulous.

Natalie:

She’s fantastic.

Kris:

She is. She’s one of our guest experts. She’s going to be a guest expert again.

Natalie:

I saw. Amazing.

Kris:

She’s also going to do the program.

Natalie:

She’s so good. She’s fantastic. She coached me on such a high level.

Kris:

She’s so good. Yeah, she’s brilliant. She’s wonderful, and everybody needs an Emily. She’s been a huge part of my success. Oh, there’s my puppy. I really love her. Okay, so money is your wheelhouse in terms of just naturally, but then you really also invest in helping women and moms manage their thinking and their minds and their overall brain health wellness. Yeah?

Natalie:

Yes, absolutely. And what I’ve found in the last probably six months with my growth is that my energy has been directed so much more towards the team in a way that I wasn’t prepared for, because I’m used to having so much time and space for the content and the vision and the marketing. And I feel really expansive when I think about those topics. I really loved them. And I wasn’t prepared for what comes with a team. I think you said it once on a podcast episode that, “We don’t realize how much went into us learning our craft.”

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

So training someone new on the team without knowing what you’ve taught me was not working.

Kris:

Yeah, exactly. It’s what’s so ingrained in you. So let’s talk about that. How many people do you have on your team right now?

Natalie:

So I have four plus me, and they’re contractors.

Kris:

uh-huh.

Natalie:

But they’re working, they’re doing it.

Kris:

Yeah?

Natalie:

Yeah. And I would say, gosh, one of the biggest shifts that I’ve had just from doing your program was when I first started, because I’ve had a few of them for a little while, I really felt like the owner, entrepreneur, where I was just delegating work to whoever was free.

Kris:

Oh, whoever could do it, whoever’s available?

Natalie:

Yeah, right. And no one had roles, no one had responsibilities other than get it done.

Kris:

But there’s an advantage to that. It sounds like they’re all generalists, they can all do everything.

Natalie:

Yeah, there is. If someone needs coverage, there’s someone else there. There’s a Loom video.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

Right?

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

But the downside of that, and you said it in the program, was I’m the one then who will always be responsible for everything.

Kris:

Yeah, for directing it and managing it and oversight. Yeah.

Natalie:

Yes, and I felt that. And I have to say, it’s so fun to go through programs, if any of you listening like a good program to consume, we all love that, but there was a point about halfway through the program where I said, “I have got to do the work.”

Kris:

Do the program?

Natalie:

Right. And more than just getting coached, which is fun too, but actually implement it.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And I scheduled a full week, probably a full 40 hours, of just redoing everything.

Kris:

You did job descriptions?

Natalie:

Yes. Job descriptions, everyone has their own responsibility doc.

Kris:

Uh-huh (affirmative).

Natalie:

And it was a lot of work. It was so worth it. I felt like a weight has lifted, not because task items are done, but because now I feel like I see the business differently in a way that it’s just a bunch of roles put together.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

You can make up the roles or move them around. And I was like, “Even I’m just a role,” and having that light bulb moment that my business isn’t actually a part of me, and being a little bit more detached was so freeing. It’s hard to explain.

Kris:

It’s so powerful. Well, it’s like we talked about on the call yesterday, we were talking to, I think it was Nancy, she was like, “When you’re so overwhelmed and you have so much going on, how do you even have time to hire someone and then train them? It’s just easier for me to do it myself.” And I was talking about how we go from me to we, to she or he, whoever the person is that’s going to do the work, but that we part, which is what you’re constructing, you were me when you first started in the program, now you’re transitioning into we, which is one part of that we is not just the team, it’s the business. The business gets a seat at the table now whereas before you were the only representative of the business, right?

Natalie:

Yes. And I love it, because I know personally some of the people who work for me, which has been a learning experience as well, it’s so fun, but to make sure I don’t have extra head drama in there. This has helped so much, because it’s less about making sure they’re happy, or even worse, making sure they like me or attempting to make sure they’re happy with me. It’s like, no, this is just what the business needs.

Kris:

Exactly.

Natalie:

And that is so freeing in a way that’s really hard to say without going through it.

Kris:

Well, and I would imagine it’s better for them too, because, I mean, you get to keep the personal connections with people. That doesn’t change. It just makes everything clearer. Everybody knows how to win and success is clearly defined. That whole leadership operating system that we teach around your vision and your values and your expectations and your team culture, building that business brain so that when things don’t go the way that you want, you have built it already so you’re not relying on your own judgment and your emotional stability in the moment like, “Oh no, let me remember. I wrote out their responsibility deck. So that’s somewhere for me to reference.” It’s so good.

Natalie:

It’s so helpful.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

I can’t even tell you how helpful it is, because it just creates that separation that wasn’t there before. And they love it.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

It also helped them realize we don’t have processes for these things, because then they got so good at it, if they’ve been there. And I want them to take time off. And other people, life events happen, so you want to have these roles in place where this person’s in the role right now and I hope that she stays forever. But maybe not, and that’s okay too. It’s just like you create this system, operating system, and it works.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). I love that. It’s so simple. It really does work when you do it.

Natalie:

Right.

Kris:

It’s good. And I want to emphasize too, because I’ve gotten a couple emails from people who started in the same time you did, and it’s the sheepish, “I disappeared. I got overwhelmed. I had this happen in my life. Oh, the COVID, we’ve had the COVID,” and there’s this shame or humiliation or embarrassment of, “I’m not keeping up,” or, “I’m not doing it right.” And what I believe about all of this, the blueprint we teach you guys and walk you through doesn’t change. It doesn’t matter if it takes you 12 weeks or six months or 12 months or whatever. That shame and that humiliation, that worry that I didn’t do it right is not serving you to step in. And so, just to your point, if you can carve two days out of your schedule and just plow through it and get a lot of things done, that’s good news, because once you’ve built those responsibility DAX, in your words, or the org chart or the job descriptions or the vision or the values, it’s built.

Natalie:

Yes, 100%. And I have to say, I didn’t do the entire program. There’s a lot in there.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

You just feel really solid with this new foundation.

Kris:

Right.

Natalie:

I have meetings every Monday now, which is so fun.

Kris:

Imagine that.

Natalie:

I know. When I do this, it’s so weird.

Kris:

[crosstalk 00:22:10] very, very grownup.

Natalie:

[crosstalk 00:22:12]. It’s like, okay, I don’t do one-to-ones yet. We have this thing in Slack where we do open floors. So the next thing I want to start is one-to-ones, and so I have this framework that you created and knowing that whatever I want to schedule in at whatever time I can do ongoing.

Kris:

Yeah, and as your business, grows more of those. Sometimes I think if you have four contractors, it may not feel as important as once you have 15 people. And then it’s like, “Okay, wait a minute. I don’t know what anybody’s doing. I need one-on-ones regularly.” So the frameworks and those fundamentals are there regardless of the size of your business. Because what I love about what I’m listening to and the way that you’re talking about it is the way you’re thinking about your role, which your role is ultimately the way you think about yourself as the CEO of this business is what’s going to drive the team success, which, of course, will drive all the scalability of your business. So I’m curious, we’re just finished, right? I mean, we have two more weeks of office hours, but technically it’s been 12 weeks. What do you think about what you know now? Outside of the tactics that you’ve implemented, how has this changed the dynamic of your business, this work?

Natalie:

When I joined, it was a high point of stress and overwhelm around the team.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

I had two people leave right when I had signed up, just coincidentally.

Kris:

Perfect.

Natalie:

In the same weekend, right when I had signed up. And I was taking it so personally, so outside of the tactics, I really felt like, “I’m not cut out for this,” or, “This is too much. I don’t know how.” There was that, it wasn’t self-pity, but it was stuckness, a little bit.

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

And now, it’s so funny. There’s this different energy around it where I’m more confident in my role, but it’s not dependent on the team’s outcomes. It’s not dependent on the people I have. So I feel like I understand how the business is supposed to operate on the backend. And there’s still that fluidity. I think it’s really fun to have a talent development plan and play around. So fun.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

But I feel like I get it. I feel like I have stepped into being a leader and feeling confident as a leader that I just didn’t know where to find that confidence from prior to joining.

Kris:

It’s so good. I love that.

Natalie:

Thank you.

Kris:

It’s really insightful too, because I was talking with another client just before this and she’s got somebody on her team, we’ve been working together for over a year, and this person, it just always comes back to this person. And so I had her go through her business and I’m like, “Tell me about the processes you have in place for this part of your business for this,” and she went through all of them. And she got to the last one, and I said, “So tell me about that,” and she’s like, “Oh, I didn’t even think about that. That works like clockwork.” I said, “Right. So what we know is that person that’s there, that role, you need the role, but the person in the role is the bottleneck for both of those other two parts of your business. And so we know what the role is. We know what the responsibilities are of that role, but the body and the role is lovely but not delivering.”

Kris:

And I’m not incredibly clinical about this in terms of how I deal with real human beings, but I do think you have to have that kind of perspective if you’re looking at your business as a dynamic organism that needs all its pieces and parts to succeed. And I’m glad those two people quit, because I know what would have happened is you would have needed a lot of coaching, because you would have done too much changing. It wouldn’t have worked. It’s actually good when people leave on their own sometimes.

Natalie:

Yeah, and what I love about having the roles down on paper, because I remember thinking, “Well, I know the roles,” it’s different when you just think the roles in your head versus actually having job descriptions and responsibility docs. And it’s such a different certainty about the roles in the org chart. Now I feel so confident in them that that’s the standard, and then it’s almost like this is what the business needs and it just takes that sense of making it so personal, which is the natural tendency I think in this journey.

Kris:

Especially in the service business when it really has been so about you and as a coach. I mean, those are some of the harder ones to transition, because it is you, the business, initially.

Natalie:

Yeah.

Kris:

But then we built systems for it, and then you’re not doing it all the time.

Natalie:

Yes. It’s so fun.

Kris:

What would you tell? I talked to someone even today who said, “Listen, I’m never going to get good at this. I’m never going to be good at managing and leading a team. And I don’t want to do it.”

Natalie:

I would say, you don’t have to do it full-time forever, but you need to learn it, do it for a little while, and then you can bring in help to help you do it.

Kris:

That’s exactly what I told her.

Natalie:

Really?

Kris:

That’s exactly what I told her. I’m like, “Listen, this is not a forever deal, but you have to know, because I’ve coached people who did hire people to come in and manage their company for them. That didn’t work out so well, because they didn’t understand anything that person was doing.”

Natalie:

Yeah. Yeah.

Kris:

So what you’ve done is really great, because you’ve invested in yourself and now no matter what, the example I gave is you could always go back and change the tire.

Natalie:

Right?

Kris:

Right. You can hire people to change the tire, but you know that if you were stuck stranded on a highway somewhere, you could take care of it.

Natalie:

Absolutely. And there are still things that I do sometimes, but in the future I don’t want to be doing, but it’s different because now I see, “Oh, this is my Director of Marketing hat that I have on now.” I don’t feel the tension because I’m not thinking in the moment, “Oh, I shouldn’t be doing this. Oh, someone else should be doing it.” I’m like, “No, I’m just stepping into the Director of Marketing role.”

Kris:

“I have a role, this role, and this is the role I’m in.”

Natalie:

Right.

Kris:

That’s good. I love it.

Natalie:

It works.

Kris:

That’s so fun. So what kind of plans do you have for your business going forward? What are you doing? What’s up?

Natalie:

I just started Facebook ads yesterday for the first time.

Kris:

That’s exciting.

Natalie:

Yeah. I mean, I have a person and I’m working with her, so that’s my big focus for the next year, and scaling to 1,000,000 and getting the full-time employees and stepping out even more.

Kris:

You don’t even need full-time employees. You don’t need employees at 1,000,000. Just a team.

Natalie:

Yes. Yes.

Kris:

That’s the one thing I have learned in my own journey, is you have to be clear about the kind of business you want it. So if you want a big business with employees and benefits and all of the pieces and parts, then build that, totally built that. Some of us don’t want that. I’m speaking personally also. I have been managed to 250 people. I’m good. I don’t want that. And so I’m intentionally building my business the way that I want it to be. But your growth, so then when you think about where you want to go, have you thought about your talent plan? Because you mentioned it, so what kind of bodies and roles you’ll need in your business going forward?

Natalie:

Yeah, my biggest hire, I’m hoping a year from now, is a full-time COO, that COO who I really think I have someone who helps with ops, but not to the level that I think I could have someone in that role for. That’s 100% next.

Kris:

Yeah. Especially for an online business, that’s that OBME role, whatever you call them, Director of Ops, that oversees all the pieces and parts. So that’s great. So much good stuff. Okay, so you’ve had quite a winding road. I’ll ask you one other question. You’ve gone from employer to CFP, to life coach, to now running a life coaching business as the CEO. And most of the women who listen are women … I just said that out loud. Most of the people who listen to this podcast are women. And so we’re going into a new year, this is going to come out I think the week of the 4th of January, so what should we all be thinking about as women leading, making new choices, living our lives? What’s your little bit of wisdom?

Natalie:

The first thing that comes to my mind is, who do you want to be and what do you want to do?

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natalie:

Because I think setting goals is really fun, we’ve just got to be careful not to set them and tie our worth and being and experience to them, especially when we just had a year like 2020, right?

Kris:

Amen, yeah.

Natalie:

So let’s set the big goals, but let’s attach to them loosely and let’s decide also who we want to be. What kind of values do you want to have and show up?

Kris:

Yeah, that’s so great. I think about that a lot myself as well. It’s less about what I achieve and more about who I’ve become along the way and am I aligning more and more to that future self that I work very actively to intentionally align with and design and so forth? So I appreciate you saying that. I think 2020, I was talking to another client the other day, and I think a lot of us who are entrepreneurs, we spend a lot of time, not a lot of time, but a lot of us worry like, “What if? What if I never get another client? What if I run out of money? What if I can’t pay my employees?” All of the things we’ve been so worried. Everybody worries. I have some clients who’ve been in business 22 years, they say, every now and then they’re like, “I don’t know if I’m going to make payroll.” It’s just a thing.

Kris:

And I’m like, “Listen, if you survived this last year, we just went through the what if year. So how about we just agree this is magic that you have a business and you get to do what you want? And sure, you have difficult employees and you have difficult decisions to make, but most of the time it’s pretty cool.”

Natalie:

Right?

Kris:

And we got through the what if year, so let’s just leave it sit.

Natalie:

Let it go and have fun.

Kris:

Yeah.

Natalie:

We made it. We could have some fun this year.

Kris:

I’m all about fun and lightheartedness and joy and playing and, yeah, all of it. You’re getting married.

Natalie:

Yes, I’m getting married.

Kris:

I’m going on my 25th wedding anniversary.

Natalie:

Yay! So fun.

Kris:

Yeah. So I have lots of marriage advice.

Natalie:

Perfect. We’ll save that for the next episode.

Kris:

We’ll wait for you to ask for it before I give it.

Natalie:

Perfect.

Kris:

Okay. Thanks for tuning in, and thank you so much, Natalie, for being here today. It’s been lovely talking with you. I appreciate it.

Natalie:

So Lovely. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

Kris:

One more thing before you go. In a world of digital courses and online content, I like to work with my clients live, because I know that when you have someone you can work with, ask questions of, and meet with, you’re so much more likely to get the success that you want. So head on over to howtoceolive.com to learn more about our very exciting, very exclusive program just for female entrepreneurs. We’ll see you there.

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