Ep #117: Q & A with How to CEO Clients

 In Podcast

I cannot believe how lucky I am to work with such amazing women leaders every. single. day. I had a Q & A call with a few of my current and former How to CEO clients and, I won’t lie to you, it was FIRE. We discussed their motivations for joining the program, what it was like as they went through the course, and what they took away from it. I can’t wait for you to listen!

What you’ll find in this episode:

  1. Erika owns a commercialization company that helps pharmaceutical companies launch their brands.
  2. Zahnia – CEO of Affinity Residential Care and Affinity Care MN.
  3. Rebecca – real estate developer.
  4. What has been the most potent, powerful, meaningful moment of learning that you didn’t expect?
  5. Why invest in this kind of work?

Featured on the Show and Other Notes:

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Podcast Transcript

Kris:

Hey, I’m Kris Plachy, host of the Lead Your Team podcast. Running a million dollar business is not easy. And whether you’re just getting started with building your team, or you’ve been at this for a while, I’m going to bring you honest, specific, and clear practices you can use right now, today, to improve how well you lead your team. Let’s go ahead and get started.

Kris:

Thank you for being here, Zahnia and Erika. What we’re going to do on this call is just chat about the, How to CEO program. I also would love for you to talk a little bit about your business and your experience, so that everyone watching has an idea of what it was that made you say, “Yeah, I want to do that.” Erika, you and I have worked together a little longer than Zahnia and I, you did the, How to CEO program and then you are now in the lab. So tell us a little bit about who you are and what you do and all the things.

Erika:

Yeah. So my name is Erika. I started a commercialization company. We help pharmaceutical companies launch their brands. So small startup pharmaceutical companies that aren’t the big Pfizers and the Mercks of the world. Helping them set up processes in place to get important products out to patients. I started the company because I believed in what I did. I love the work. I love what I do.

Erika:

I think there was a moment where I realized I could do more if I hired more team members and we tried to help more companies. What I didn’t realize in that time is just how hard it is to manage people and manage teams and manage emotions. And so as much as I loved the work, I felt like I couldn’t figure this out. And when I found your program, it has changed my life. So there’s that.

Kris:

It’s changed your life?

Erika:

Yeah.

Kris:

Okay. Why has it changed your life?

Erika:

You can read books that talk about how to have hard conversations. You can watch podcasts, you can take classes in terms of the right way to manage, here’s how you format one-on-ones. I read them all. I have stacks and stacks of leadership books. I think the difference is the way that you teach the team in terms of how to fundamentally set up your business. It’s what I do for these companies, you help me do for my company, in terms of really outlining the structural foundation for us of the vision, the mission, our core values, and then laddering everything back to that, so it wasn’t emotional in term of how to manage the team.

Erika:

Everything was around, “What do we do as a company? What do we do as an organization? What are the things that we’ve committed to each other to do?” And it’s just changed all the conversations we’ve had and it’s also changed the way I react to situations as they come up with a team. I always just kept telling myself, “It’s not rocket science. I don’t know why I can’t figure this out.” And I felt very inadequate. So here I am launching billion dollar brands and then at the same time, feeling so inadequate. And being able to see other women here, going through the same thing, you realize, “If I’m not broken, there’s nothing wrong with me.” But I just needed these processes and it’s been really life-changing

Kris:

That’s so good. I love all of that. I love the juxtaposition that you shared too, right? Like, “Here I am launching billion dollar brands and why am I losing my mind over this issue with my employee?” And that kind of thinking is really common. Like, “I’m so good at this and yet over here, I feel so incapable.” And I know that a lot of my clients before we start working together, hide in shame, like somehow you should know better. Somehow you should just have this information or because you’re a woman, you should be good at it. I think a lot of women think that we should just be naturally good at this stuff. So I love just you being vulnerable and sharing that that’s true for you. Okay, so Zahnia, what do you do and why are you here?

Zahnia:

Hi, I’m Zahnia. I am the CEO of Affinity Residential Care and Affinity Care MN. So I’m based in Minnesota and we have residential assisted living facilities and we also do homelessness outreach in 24 hour care.

Kris:

What was it that made you say, “Yeah, I’ve got to do this?”

Zahnia:

I did do one-on-one coaching with Michelle, so that was a little bit before I hit the seven figure mark and the wheels were falling off. Yeah, just a bit. And then literally, as soon as I was hitting over the seven figure threshold, the wheels fell off. I only had two left and I was at my complete breaking point. I had ineffective team members. I was working out of my trunk. Everything was just so unorganized, and I had no clear vision and mission and I didn’t really have clear values. So I feel like-

Kris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). It means holding people accountable and managing people talk when you don’t have those values figured out, right?

Zahnia:

It really does. So what brought me to the program was, of course, doing the one-on-one coaching, but also just seeing that, “Oh, okay, there’s a comradery here. There are other female business owners, female founders, female CEOs, who have the same issues that I do.” And then I’ve just met some amazing other CEOs that are just doing so many boss things. So I love it.

Kris:

It is pretty empowering, right? And I’ll say this about Zahnia, I think Zahnia takes the prize as being our youngest CEO ever. She just had a birthday, but she still doesn’t have a three in front of her number, she’s a baby. But what’s so fun is she’s so successful already, right? And she’s not even in the threes yet. We’ve all taken her also under our wing. So in addition to her getting coaching with me, she’s got this gaggle of women who are managing her.

Zahnia:

I feel emotional about it, because it’s just this amazing… It’s a mix of a mother and sisterhood.

Kris:

For you, the rest of us it’s sisters.

Zahnia:

For everyone else, it’s more like sisters, but for me, since I’m the youngest, everyone has really showed me so much of like… I look at a lot of you guys and I’m like, “Wow, this is going to be me,” with the confidence and all of that. So I love that part.

Kris:

That’s so good. I love it. Assisted living in the time of COVID, that’s no joke either. And so you really reaching out when you did was critical because this has been such a rough year, just in general, let alone learning how to manage and lead and grow the team, right? And deal with all those team issues. I’m glad you’re here. Rebecca, hi.

Rebecca:

You know when you run your own business and shit doesn’t go the way it’s meant to go, I’ve had to jump onto my son’s Zoom [inaudible 00:07:28].

Kris:

Yeah, I saw William, I’m like, “Oh, that’s Rebecca.” Okay, so Rebecca, the first question I asked really was, what do you do? And why are you here? Why did you decide to do, How to CEO? You were just with this last, How to CEO Group, same with Zahnia. And then Erika and I have known each other for maybe about a year, less than a year maybe? I don’t remember. I’m terrible.

Rebecca:

Sorry.

Kris:

What do you do? Why are you here?

Rebecca:

We’re real estate developers, so we buy old mill buildings in the Northeast, quite large, from a 100,000 square foot to about 300,000 square foot. We buy them environmentally contaminated; it depends on what it is. Zone them, design them, build them out, and then hold them as rental. We used to sell condos in the early 90s, but now we just do rentals, that’s what we do. We do real estate deals that just come across the desk, it could be land, it could be anything, whatever we fancy or whatever makes them make money at the end of the day. Now, why did I come to the CEO program?

Rebecca:

I’ve been following you on a podcast initially. I was just looking at my, “Oh, I like this woman.” I just kept following you. And then one of the big issues that I was going to initially join it and I didn’t, and I think the investment, it wasn’t a financial investment that I was worried about, it was more that I was, “Why do I need this and why do I not know this already this long into the business?” So I fought with that idea a little bit like, “Why are you going on a coaching course? And you’re meant to know this.” You know, all the things that swirl in your head. So I had a big fight with myself for that.

Kris:

We actually just talked about that right before you hopped on.

Rebecca:

Oh, you did?

Kris:

That is one of the more common things I hear and there’s a lot of shame with that, right? Like, “I should know how to deal with this, this shouldn’t be over my head. I’m so good over here, just look at me, I have kajillions of dollars in property. Why can’t I tell Tina how to get over her attitude, or whatever?”

Rebecca:

No going. Yeah, okay. But then what really switched me to think it was, I was like, “Well, I came out of college.” And one of the things me and my husband decided coming out of college was we’re never going to work for anybody. So besides doing the waitressing job in college and the odd jobs getting through college, we just made that decision very early on, like at 21, 22.

Rebecca:

So then I thought to myself, “Well, I’ve never really had a corporate or working for someone else training. I’ve just never experienced somebody tell me, besides college job, somebody telling me what to do in a career or in my job.” And then I thought, “You’ve got to forgive yourself, Rebecca, because you don’t know.” Some stuff I just don’t know. We started off very small and we’ve just built this big business and we relied on ourselves to teach ourselves. So then I just went, “You know what, I need some training. I need some help. I need some coaching.” And then I signed up.

Kris:

I think that’s really common, because a lot of my clients are experts in something, right? Zahnia is a nurse, right? And Erika, I don’t know what your education is. What did you do? What did you focus on?

Erika:

Marketing and communication.

Kris:

There we go, marketing. So we get our skillset, but I would say, more than a majority of my clients have been doctors or physiotherapists or they inherited a business from their parents, right? So they didn’t ever work in that traditional environment. So you don’t have that to leverage. That’s great insight.

Rebecca:

No, no. So yeah, no one’s ever told me, “Oh, you need to do your spreadsheets like this, or you need… So really, in reality, I was thinking about this when I was listening to you on Instagram, I was like, “God, you really are a little bit self-taught.” So there are discrepancies in some things we don’t know, or I choose, I’ve not been trained in. So we’ve learned, as we’ve just developed this business and that was my draw to that. And now I know, when somebody mentions culture in a couple of years and I’m like, like a life coach or any coach and I’m like, “What the hell is a life coach?”

Kris:

And why would I want one?

Rebecca:

And I’m like, “Why would I want… I think I said, “Why would I want someone to tell me how to run my life?” And now, I’m like, “Oh my God, why don’t you have one?”

Kris:

Right. Well, how can you function without this? I don’t know how people live without coaching. And I’m not even saying that because I’m a coach. I have a personal coach, and then I have a coach I work with to help me take care of my health. And then I have the best girlfriend, who happens to be the world’s best life coach, who I talk to once a week. Anyway, I don’t know how people get through a week without having someone listen to their brain and say, “Listen to me, this over here is a no.”

Rebecca:

I know. And it’s actually interesting. I mean, I’m going to join the CEO lab as well. I need to get on that as well.

Kris:

Yeah, you do.

Rebecca:

Now people ask me, I’m like, “Oh, you haven’t got one?”

Kris:

What’s wrong with you?

Rebecca:

I’m like, “Why haven’t you got one? Oh, it’s a must.”

Kris:

I have to tell y’all, I met Rebecca, I did some small group consults before the January group, and I met her in that consult. And Miriam was on the call and we both got off the call and Slacked each other. We were like, “Please let Rebecca sign up, please. If nothing else, she’s such a ray of sunshine. She’s so hysterical.” Yesterday, we were doing an office-hours and she was talking about something. And she was like, “I just wanted to tell her, stop being such a cheeky bitch.”

Rebecca:

I know.

Kris:

Everything is better with you on the call. So here’s the thing that I think is so important, because I know a lot of people don’t know me. They listen to my podcast, one of the things I hear a lot about people who listen to the podcast, is they like that I laugh. And the truth is too-

Rebecca:

I think that’s one thing that tickles me about you as well.

Kris:

Maybe you’re all alone laughing, which is funny, but we have a really good time. I think we have fun. And you know what, managing people sucks a lot of the time. And so I do love that there’s this place you could come and you could say, OMG, right? What did somebody see today, Zahnia? Someone said, “Doesn’t she know?” That was the way they started the sentence. Was that on the office hours this morning? Or maybe it was-

Zahnia:

It was. Yeah, they know.

Kris:

Doesn’t she know that… No, she doesn’t know. No, that’s why you have to know how to manage her.

Zahnia:

Common sense is not so common.

Kris:

No, it’s not.

Rebecca:

And really, managing is a whole different job.

Kris:

Yes.

Rebecca:

I’m like, “Oh my god, I need to speak to somebody about managing, because I need to do my work and what we do.” But now you’re getting into this management side, I’m like, Oh, God.”

Kris:

Yeah, but what I love too, I had a lab call today and one of the women who I’ve worked with for quite some time, she came to the call and she had just taken a two week vacation and she said, “And so then I came back and there wasn’t really anything for me to do, so I took another vacation and took another week off.” And then she said, “And I’ve actually made twice as much money this year, as I did last year.”

Kris:

And so we were laughing, because it’s stupid. It doesn’t make any sense. But she said, “You told me this three years ago, you said there will be this day where you’ll be bored, and you won’t know what to do with yourself.” And that’s to me what management buys you over time, right? The bigger your team, the bigger the turn. If you’ve got five or six people, that goes faster. If you’ve got 18 people… I told someone the other day, she has 300 people, I’m like, “That’s 36 months, are you in it for that long, because then it’s worth it.”

Rebecca:

Yeah. And then I think another thing that really struck a chord is on the hiring process. Maybe I’m not hired yet, but one thing I’ve definitely learned is who not to hire. That’s been key, because prior to this program, I would have been like, “Yeah, you’re good. Come in.” Oh God, that didn’t work out. Oh, you’re good. Come in.” Now I’m realizing who not to hire. I’m going to wait for that right person to come. Besides all the other stuff you teach as well.

Kris:

I think that’s actually a question that I was going to ask you in the time that we’ve worked together. So Erika, I’ll throw this to you. What do you think has been the most, I don’t know, potent, powerful, meaningful moment or learning that you didn’t expect either? Like, “Oh, that struck me and now you get to keep it, whatever that is.”

Erika:

That’s a great question. I’m not sure how to say it, but I think that the biggest turning point for me and what I think has allowed me to accelerate my business so fast is by being able to take the emotion out of the conversations that I’m having with my employees. I’m not thinking about it all the time. I remember years ago, reading a Harvard business review article and it said, “If you’re lying in bed and it’s 2:00 AM and you’re thinking about your employee, that’s a problem, because the only person you should be thinking about at two in the morning is your husband or your kids, family.”

Kris:

The guy lying next to you or the gal next to you. Yeah, that’s who you should be thinking about at two in the morning, if you know what I mean.

Erika:

Yes. And I’ve been thinking, “I absolutely agree. I want to do this.” They tell you, compartmentalize, manage your emotions. And you’re trying, and you’re trying, and you’re trying, but it is draining and it’s still not at the core of the issue that you haven’t managed how you think about the conversation and how you think about how you’re going to talk to them in reference to your core values or into your vision or your mission. It’s still a very personal, because your business is personal. You’ve built it and you care about it and it is like your baby.

Erika:

And so everything feels very personal. And so this course, being able to change the paradigm shift for me of that conversation, has just allowed my mind to free up so much space that now I’m thinking about, “What are the subsets of my company I’m going to build out? What teams do I need to have? What other new markets am I going to go after?” It’s exciting again and it’s exhilarating again, versus this draining and emotion of, “I can’t believe I have to have this conversation or I’m still thinking about what somebody said, I mean just all of it.”

Kris:

Yeah. Oh my gosh, that’s so powerful. What I heard you say, if I could synthesize, is when you learn how, right? When you learn these mechanisms of leading and managing without being so attached, you drop lag and [inaudible 00:19:03], because it slows you down when you’re afraid to talk to them or don’t know how to say it or resentful of their behavior, all the things all of that creates. I imagine a parachute behind you slowing you down, either emotionally, energetically, or even just literally, physically, because you haven’t advanced something. So that’s super powerful and insightful.

Kris:

And that’s one of the things that I’ve always liked about the teachers I learned from, that I now share with you, over the years, many, many years ago, is that I can love you deeply and care for you deeply and think fondly of you and respect you as a human and not manage you from my emotional state. And that that’s actually the best gift I can give our relationship as employee and leader. And that my emotion isn’t, it’s not your job as my employee to make me feel good and vice versa. It’s our job to get the work done, but I can love you and still tell you that was a terrible job, right?

Kris:

And not feel like I’m being mean. So I’m glad you said that, because I think a lot of people think those are oxymoronish, the only way to actually hold people accountable and deal with performance issues is to be a jerk. And I love that you’re seeing like… Because you really are a self-identified empath, right? Which means that you really feel what other people feel. And that just makes this even more heavy if you don’t learn how to manage that. Yeah, thank you. Zahnia, what are your thoughts?

Zahnia:

Something came to mind too, one thing about the program that I do love are the guest experts. I mean, just epic. Seriously, come on. Really? That’s one of the favorite parts of this program, but I do also want to say that something like an aha moment that I had was that I can be picky. I can be picky, I can be particular, and I can have expectations and not feel bad about it.

Kris:

You don’t have to tolerate stuff.

Zahnia:

I don’t have to tolerate anything. And that was just from my immature behaviors seeping in from the past, people pleasing and passive aggressiveness. I find myself being a lot less passive aggressive.

Kris:

[inaudible 00:21:41]. It’s just a waste of time.

Zahnia:

It’s a waste of time. And that is something that I will say that was impacted by this program. My expectations are high. My expectations have always been high, I’ve just never been able to communicate that correctly.

Kris:

Well, that’s what I say, right? There are no expectations that are too high. All we have are expectations that we haven’t clearly defined and explained, so then they can feel high. But if I tell you exactly what I want, then it’s up to you to say yes or no.

Zahnia:

It’s up to you if you’re going to do it. And if you’re not, then fine.

Kris:

Somebody will.

Zahnia:

And I’ve fired two people since starting this program.

Kris:

Important people.

Zahnia:

And I could never fire someone just like that. I have to be 100% honest, I’m such a worm.

Kris:

You’re a nurse.

Zahnia:

Yeah, I’m a nurse.

Kris:

You love all the people.

Zahnia:

I love all the people and I was falling apart. It was eating me alive. And so I was able to terminate.

Kris:

Look at her face, I want to say terminate.

Zahnia:

Terminate.

Kris:

[inaudible 00:22:56]. Yes, you were, because it’s not an employee’s job to save you either, right? And that’s this dynamic we get into, sometimes this dance of like, “Well, I need them.” So I have to tolerate that, because I need them and then we just set this unhealthy dynamic when you’re going to be fine. I talked to somebody yesterday, who’s like, “Well, if that doesn’t work out, then I’m going to have to do their job for a while.” I’m like, “Yeah, but you’ll be fine.”

Zahnia:

I could have never imagined that. I could have never imagined that before with everything. You think with everything going on, that’s not a possibility, but after it’s done, it feels so fresh and so clear. So yeah, it feels amazing.

Kris:

And then when you hire someone, right? You’ve hired someone recently and you hire them with your expectations and what you want to achieve with your business, and now you’re like, “Oh my gosh, they’re amazing.” [inaudible 00:23:53] because you’re clear about what you want from them and they know how to deliver.

Zahnia:

Another thing I wanted to talk about too, is that just like she said, taking me out of it as the owner, as the founder, you know what I mean? If you affect or if you don’t do things in alignment with the vision of the company, you’re disrespecting me, and that’s not the case. So that was huge for me and that really made a turn in my thoughts. Yeah, Kris has so many good quotes, I just have to write stuff down. You have so many good quotes.

Kris:

I might never remember anything I say, it’s a good thing it’s all recorded, because I don’t know. It’s all good. It’s so much fun. All right, Rebecca, over to you or William.

Rebecca:

No, I would dovetail a lot what Erika and Zahnia were saying, I think taking the personal aspect out of some of the decisions and how you deal with your staff is so important, because relatively these are our babies, aren’t they? We’ve grown them from being a little baby and now they’re adults and they don’t need to be taken care of in the same way as we did before. So I think that’s been, for me, now I approach a lot of things, a lot more calmer. Like yesterday, I went and dealt with my [inaudible 00:25:26], he told me I should do it myself.

Rebecca:

And I took it in a very way, different approach, then I would have been like, “Well, this is just the way I want it done, and that’s just it.” Now, I try and step by step the suggestions you say, and I find more relief in it. I just find a lot more relief in myself and just a lot more, “This is not too bad. I can do this.” And if the outcome is the outcome, I’m okay with that outcome as well, rather than like, “Oh my God, if she walks away, I’m going to be screwed.” No, I just deal with it in that way you’ve taught us and the outcome is better anyway. And I feel better and I just feel more in control without that emotional stuff coming out.

Kris:

That’s what always is the hardest part, because when we react out of that emotion, then we know we show up in a way we don’t love. And then there’s a rebound from that or a boomerang. [inaudible 00:26:30] is a great example, right? Is that’s one of the values of the office hours is I do enough of those that you can come, if you do have a thing that comes up in your work that day, come to an office hour. So we’ll talk through, all right.

Rebecca:

And then I think expectations, but leveling up the expectations slightly as well has definitely, definitely worked for me. I’m not just going to put up with shoddy work, I just want it done the way it’s meant to be done now and just really setting them expectations out, so they know. And really, probably that was… I think the key thing that I’ve… There’s a lot of major things, but another thing is, is really checking myself as a leader and really, what am I doing wrong? And in reality, very true to myself, I probably have not done a lot of things right. I’m not expressing myself correctly, I’m not being clear. So I’m really taking onus of all that as well.

Erika:

Yeah, I agree. I think that Kris, is there is no other forum where you have somebody that you come to the meeting feeling like they’re truly a peer. Everyone else works for you, so it’s very lonely and there isn’t anyone who can actually check you. For me, one of the things you had said clear is kind, be clear, tell them what you’re asking for. And you also helped me get this idea around, “Well, shouldn’t they know?”

Erika:

Even just saying that, we’ve done it the other time, so wouldn’t they think that we would just do it the same way again? And they don’t, it’s not something that stays with them. And so then it’s this perpetual disappointment every day that your team lets you down, when really, it’s me that hadn’t said anything to them. And it wasn’t until I had calls with you where you ask questions like, “Well, how did you communicate? What did you ask them to do? Did you tell them when you wanted it done [inaudible 00:28:29]?”

Rebecca:

And then, do you know what I do now? I have this little thing on my shoulder, “Ooh, I’ve got to go and ask my boss that.” And I think I said it out loud once. And my rental person goes, “Who are you talking about, Rebecca? Oh, Kris, you don’t know her.”

Kris:

It’s a little bit of wisdom on your shoulder, but I mean, ultimately that is the goal I have for everybody is, and I stand on the shoulder of giants too. So everything I know is through my own experience and I have the benefit of working for some really terrible, but also really amazing leaders. I get on my soap box a little bit, but I really do think we’re in a very evolutionary phase of leadership right now. And leaders who can create spaces for people to thrive without playing to the lowest denominator or the lowest vibrational level of human behavior, but holding it up here like, “No, no, no, no, no, no, come on up here, I can hold it, but I’m going to create the space and show you what it looks like.”

Kris:

I think that’s how we change the world and we change the production of the world and we change engagement and we change performance and we change how much money people make, all the things. So I love that it’s all landed. Okay, I’m going to wrap up, but I have one more question, because this is what always is the thing, right? It’s not a drop in the bucket. I asked this on the Instagram the other day, right? You’re spending some money to do this program and it’s not buying you leads and it’s not buying new customers, right? So why invest in this kind of work when you might have also competition for your dollars to help you with marketing or to help you with revenue or to help you with IT or whatever? So what are your thoughts?

Rebecca:

I invested in this, as I said before, I thought I knew everything, I realized I didn’t. I think it’s a great investment in you as a person. And I’m really a woman as I’d rather invest in you than a new bag or a new pair of shoes, because as you mature and get older, you start to realize that investment is so, so important. And I think we as women, I was actually in a meeting not long ago, they want me to join a group.

Rebecca:

And I’m like, “As women, we tend to shy away from the investment in ourselves. We think it’s not important.’ And to me, it’s really at the top of my ladder at the moment and carrying forward, it’s going to be at the top. I just think it’s a great program. You’ve taught me so much. I talk about you so much, Kris. People go, “Well, can we get Kris to come?” I’m like, “Ooh, I’ll ask her.”

Kris:

All right. If they all sound like you, I might be there. I’m coming to New York, so I’m going to see you in person in a couple months.

Rebecca:

Oh, yeah. Great. So I think it’s worth every single penny and the value you give, I mean, I was even thinking this the other day, that my value and time we get with you, I was going to assume it’s once a week, and now I’m blown away about how many times I’ve had to miss, because I can’t make it, but blown away by when I’ve needed something or I want to jump on, it’s either a live or there’s a recording. I can always catch up. I think the value is really priceless.

Kris:

Well, thank you. And that’s a goal for me, because I love what I do. So there’s a lot of platforms, a lot of environments where you can go and you don’t really get the founder person anymore, which is fine. I don’t begrudge anybody that, but that’s not the business I have any interest in creating to the extent that I can continue to support the way that we do this, I will, because listen, I don’t understand why I get paid to do this. I think it’s ridiculous, because I get to hang out with gorgeous, amazing, smart people all day. Why wouldn’t I do that?

Rebecca:

And I just love all the women on the program as well.

Kris:

Yeah, I know it. I will give myself a lot of props, I attract really amazing people. Seriously, there isn’t one person I wouldn’t go on a weekend vacation in Tahoe with. Everybody is super fun, interesting, thoughtful, honest, supportive, all of it. Yes, Zahnia.

Zahnia:

I have a few things to say, because I forget things all the time, so I have to write these down.

Kris:

You do it.

Zahnia:

Okay. So when we went to Hawaii, that was-

Kris:

She came to the Hawaii retreat.

Zahnia:

I came to the Hawaii retreat, which was offered within this program, which was invaluable. So me and another, one of the amazing CEOs, Mary, we were having a conversation and we were just talking about how I feel like through this program, in this program, there’s nothing that’s going to come about that I can’t handle, absolute. There’s nothing that’s going to happen in this business that can’t be figured out.

Kris:

I get chills all over my body.

Zahnia:

And that is 100%. We had a very deep conversation about that at dinner, because I feel like the tools that I’ve learned in this program have really set me up for success. It’s something that it’s not only a professional shift, but it’s also a spiritual shift. And so, because I’ve had that spiritual shift, there’s no money in the world that you can buy that with. Yeah, I just simply could not have seen myself make the moves that I’ve made and I’ve made more money. So since joining this program and all of the different things that I’ve learned, I’ve made triple of what the investment is, their ROI is not a joke.

Kris:

Yeah, that’s so good. I love to hear you say that because I don’t think a lot of people investing in themselves, does it make sense on paper? And I don’t sell that you make more money, because I don’t, but every single one of my clients does end up making more money. And in most cases, a lot more money, because when you’re cleaner and you’re better, it’s amazing what can happen. So I love that you said that. And I want to echo something Rebecca said, because this is really interesting. I used to coach guys, I don’t so much anymore. Men never think twice about spending money on themselves when it has to do with business. They don’t need to think twice about it. And women are always trying to justify the whole thing. It’s so fascinating. So don’t do that.

Zahnia:

It is. The last thing I have to say, Kris, before Erika goes is, I was talking to my boyfriend about signing up for the lab and he was like, “That’s a no-brainer.” He was like, “That’s a no-brainer.” I was like, “I never said it was a brainer, but-

Kris:

He’s like, “Because I like this Zahnia, so whatever’s happening here, can we-

Zahnia:

And he came to Hawaii too and he saw that I was just spicy, I loved it. Yeah, he was just like, “This is invaluable. I’ve seen such a transformation in you since you invested in this program.” And this is really an investment in myself and my professional and spiritual development, and I cannot thank you enough. Everything you do will always be so deeply rooted in my heart.

Kris:

Okay. Well, I’m speechless. So Erika?

Erika:

How do I follow that? It’s true though. Honestly, Kris, the first program to go through before I went into the lab, there was a lot of thinking behind that in terms of, “Does this make sense for me? I feel like I’m doing all of the things, I’ve set up everything I’ve needed to set up. I just have to figure this out.” And there is that feeling of, “I should have already known how to figure some of these things out,” but I would say to anyone who’s considering this program, “This should be the same thing as you get an accountant, as you get an email addresses, as you have a website, that must be a fundamental piece.”

Erika:

If you were running a business, you should be investing here, because it doesn’t matter the size company that you have, if you don’t figure this piece out, it will drag you down. As you get bigger, it just becomes a bigger problem. From an ROI perspective, it’s true. I think by teaching me how to put processes in place, and we’re such a custom business where we come in and we really tailor to the client, so it doesn’t feel like it can be automated. I didn’t think it was possible, but it is possible.

Erika:

And by allowing my team to do more, I can now do more and help more. I will also say, when I thought about moving into the lab, it was the same thing that you just shared around the best compliment I’ve ever had is, “Erika, you’ve always been such a leader. Your passion is clearly there. You love what you do. You pull us with you. We’re here because you’re so passionate about what we’re doing and we’re clear about the mission, but now there’s leadership with substance, because it’s that huge, huge.”

Kris:

That’s brilliant. Like, “We were following you because we believed you, but now, there’s this depth to you.” That’s gorgeous. What a lovely compliment. That’s wonderful. Well, I’m always just so incredibly grateful for you, for your time. You are all collectively running kajillions of dollars business. So I know you’re busy and you have a lot on your plates. And so you taking the time to do this, both just to share with me, but also with other women like you, who will have an opportunity to see this, just on everyone’s behalf, thank you. And it is my honor to work with you.

Kris:

I feel very blessed every day that I get to wake up and sit at this white chair, talk to people all over the world. But my goal is this coming year, once we’re all vaccinated and we can do things, I’m going to start doing some, I don’t know, live events or coffees or cocktail hours around the country, wouldn’t that be fun? I have visions. I have visions of hugs everywhere. I can’t wait. All right. Thank you for being here. I’m super grateful.

Kris:

One more thing before you go, in a world of digital courses and online content, I like to work with my clients live, because I know that when you have someone you can work with, ask questions of, and meet with, you’re so much more likely to get the success that you want. So head on over to howtoceolive.com to learn more about our very exciting, very exclusive program, Just For Female Entrepreneurs, we’ll see you there. (music playing).

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